The Strange World Of Open-Source Pancreas Hacking

This is a Closed Loop Artificial Pancreas System consisting of a compute module and a 900 MHz radio. While it may not be pretty, it is actually keeping someone alive.

Opinions and views expressed in this blog do not reflect those of my employer and are wholly my own.

I have been lucky and gotten to travel the world and meet many interesting people building many interesting hardware projects with compute modules. Some of the more interesting projects come from the the OpenAPS movement, who are using compute modules to help Type I Diabetes sufferers manage their condition. I wanted to write a blog about what is going on in the OpenAPS movement and share some of the interesting hardware projects being built by hackers to manage their conditions.

A compute module is a tiny, cheap computer you can stick into things to make them smart (and often add Linux / Windows IoT and wireless connectivity).

Open source hardware hacking of life-sustaining equipment is highly dangerous and legally vague, why would anyone take this risk? Because current government regulations have delayed the creation of convenient systems for Type I Diabetes management until several years from now. As a result, the OpenAPS “We Are Not Waiting” movement has been born.
[Read more…]

The Chaos and The Craftsmanship of Shenzhen – Intel IDF 16

IMG_4469

A Pilgrimage To The Maker Mecca

When I arrived in Shenzhen this week to participate in Intel IDF 16, I hoped to learn more about the roaring technological innovation happening in this unique city. This is part III in my series documenting aspects of my brief trip to the city of makers this week. Read part II here and Part I here.

Developed By You

The ultimate purpose of my visiting Shenzhen, aside from meeting with a few interesting partners and customers, was to give two talks at Intel IDF 16 on topics relating to Intel’s Inventor Platforms and the results of research I have been doing with customers on their experience productizing on the Intel Edison compute module. Being new to Shenzhen, it was fascinating to see what the local “players” in the maker space where up to.

IMG_4475

A few interesting items were announced at the keynote including a beta of the Intel Curie module software experience (variously described as a BSP or an ODK aka Open Developer Kit) and a new robotics kit based on Intel RealSense and the UP Board from AAEON. There were other announcements as well relating to Intel 3D XPoint Memory. [Read more…]

The Chaos and The Craftsmanship of Shenzhen – The SEG Electronics Market

IMG_4324

A Pilgrimage To The Maker Mecca

When I arrived in Shenzhen this week to participate in Intel IDF 16, I hoped to learn more about the roaring technological innovation happening in this unique city. This is part II in my series documenting aspects of my brief trip to the city of makers this week. Read part I here and part III here.

The SEG Electronics Market – The Pulse Of The Maker Movement

I go to SEG once per quarter to look for trends. You can tell which way the market is going by seeing what new shops have opened, what new products are being sold. – A Shenzhen CEO

IMG_4327
The exterior, relatively indescript entrance to the SEG market.

If Shenzhen is the Maker Mecca, the SEG Electronics Market may be the Kaaba, the center of the attraction, the entire point of going. There are ten thousand products, every maker device, every screw, every LED and every new trendy gadget piled into stacks and arranged into squares. Entering a side door in the building (which is labeled Huaqiangbei), a visitor is greeted by throngs of vendors selling the tiniest of components, cables, wires and more. [Read more…]

The Chaos and The Craftsmanship of Shenzhen – Dafen Oil Painting Village

artists
An oil painter practicing his craft in Dafen Village.

A Pilgrimage To The Maker Mecca

When I arrived in Shenzhen this week to participate in Intel IDF 16, I hoped to learn more about the roaring technological innovation happening in this unique city. This is part I in my series documenting aspects of my brief trip to the city of makers this week. Read part II here and part III here.

The Dafen Oil Painting Village – A Metaphor For Shenzhen’s Tech Economy

The defining “Shenzhen” moment for me was not the crowds, the maker and electronics markets nor the sprawling industrial zones, factory tours, it was the Dafen Oil Painting village, where hundreds of skilled artisans convene daily to create realistic copies of  artwork for export. The prices? Affordable. [Read more…]

Meet The Inventors, The Engine Of The Maker Movement

IMG_0681

The Maturing Maker Movement

Starting in the mid-2000’s, the Maker Movement swept across the globe powered by an onrush of new, cheaper, more useable hardware and software tools. Within the span of a  few years, students, musicians, artists and designers flocked to a growing number of Maker Faires scattered across the world.

The hype around Makers was (and still is) extreme. Just as the Homebrew Computing Club helped launch the age of personal computing, it was reasoned that the Maker Movement would launch the “Next Big Thing” in the form of a raft of next-generation tech companies. Specifically, it was expected that Internet of Things companies (who produce value by linking and orchestrating devices) would rain from the sky as a result of the Maker Movement…but no one was quite sure how that would happen.

The good news is that the formation of a new class of startup is exactly what is happening. However the way it is happening differs from what many industry observers have anticipated. The initial emphasis on “The Internet of Things” has caused confusion as to the true heart of the economic engine which drives the Maker Movement – A segment of users I am going to describe as “The Inventors.” While the Internet of Things is of major importance, it is significantly less interesting to Inventors though they frequently are the ones who are actually implementing it.

Internet of Things-focused companies such as Electric Imp and Particle have certainly spawned from the Maker Movement, but only as a small sub-section. To understand what is really going on (and where extended economic opportunities lie for many tech companies), we need to look more closely at Inventors and try to understand their motivations.

IMG_0997

Meet The Inventors

Makers tend to be artists, designers, students and musicians who have been enabled to build technical projects by advancements in user (or developer) experience. Inventors tend to be industry-quality professionals possessing pro-level skills in areas such as hardware, industrial design or software. Inventors use these pro-level skills to build products specifically for Makers.  These inventions can encompass new musical instruments, 3D printers, home laser-cutters, drone prototyping platforms, paper craft, small programmable robots and more.

Their goal? Making technology accessible and useable to a broader range of creative people. Don’t look too closely for “adding internet to things” as a core motivator, it isn’t there.

As a result of their skills and motiviations, Inventors are the ones “laying down tracks” in front of the Maker Movement, helping to enable creative projects in new domains to a wider audience than ever before. If there is a complex technology which can remotely be used to make art or music, Inventors strive to make it more useable, widely available and cheaper. If Makers are musicians, Inventors are the ones building new drum machines and synthesizers to help Makers practice their art.

Adding internet to things is often a byproduct, but not the focus, of these Inventors and it is a mistake to talk to them as though it were.

IMG_1006

Inventors Don’t Really Care About The Internet Of Things

Inventor’s motivation is not to connect things to the cloud or make more things smart – This can be an area of confusion for industry observers. The motivations of Inventors are much more fundamental and human than making money or lowering cost – Inventors seek to educate and empower Maker creativity.

Many of the Inventors I have met could walk into Google and get hired on the spot as Sr. Engineers (or better) but they never will – they are too engrossed in their mission of making the world of technology more useable to stop what they are doing.

Chances are, if you start talking with an Inventor about “The Internet of Things,” they will become bored and wander off mid-sentence. However, this is exactly the language which is too often used to attempt to entice Inventors to use a variety of embedded systems and other professional tools and hardware gadgets.

Marketing To Inventors

If you are going to market technology to Inventors, it is important talk about the opportunity to make technology more accessible to more people. Tell stories about what can be done with your technology by Makers, not how it can save cost. If internet connectivity helps Inventors to serve the Maker Movement, they will add it – otherwise connectivity for it’s own sake is not their area of interest.

Examples Of Inventors

I can’t name them all, there are too many, but here are a few examples of the types of people I am talking about (pro-skilled developers targeting Makers as a group):

  • Dronesmith.io
    • How they enable Makers: Dronesmith Luci lets developers build their own drone solutions.
  • Rick Waldron, Bocoup & Johnny-Five
    • How they enable Makers: Builds the Johnny-Five JS library to allow web developers to create robots
  • DF Robot, Seeed Studio, Adafruit, SparkFun, Tektye, Pololu, RobotShop
    • How they enable Makers: Create a huge variety of robotics platforms, hobby boards, sensors to make it easy to build hardware projects
  • The Hybrid Group
    • How they enable Makers: Product Cylon, Artoo, Gobot to let developers program hardware with the language of their choice
  •  OSH Park, Upverter, CircuitHub
    • How they enable Makers: Allow rapid prototyping and turn around of custom hardware components
  • DJ Hardrich, DJ Qbert, DJ Yoga Frog and the Thud Rumble crew
    • How they enable Makers: Produce custom music equipment for DJs and other electronics musicians
  • Particle
    • How they enable Makers: Provide various products and hobby boards which can be used either to prototype or to go to market. This is one company that does span into the Internet of Things quite directly.
  • Glowforge
    • How they enable Makers: Provide a much cheaper at-home laser cutter machine which can be used by any maker for $2,000

Final Thoughts

I hope this has helped clarified how and where Makers and the Internet of Things intersect and the fundamental motivations of the players involved. Inventors are an extremely important class of Maker and require a different approach than what is often being used. In short: There is more to the future than the Internet of Things!

Enter the Thud Rumble

Somehow learning to code has lead to me hanging out with the world’s most talented DJ crew over at Thud Rumble. Had an amazing all day session with DJ Qbert, DJ Yogafrog and DJ Hardrich down in the bay area. These guys are seriously legit, amazing to hear about all of the new project and products they have underway. Really looking forward to working closely with these guys this year.

AWS NYC Pop-Up Loft Lightning Talk + Workshop

IMG_3037

I was invited by Amazon Web Services to give a talk at the NYC Loft to discuss some of the trends happening in Internet of Things over the last year and run a workshop focusing on Intel Edison over the course of two days.

Thanks to the excellent folks from Dash and Canary we had a great lineup of talks last Thursday, probably around 80-100 developers were in attendance and another 40 for the workshop the following day. Really enjoyed making the trip and seeing the new AWS space, looking forward to exploring many more potential areas of collaboration between Intel and AWS IoT ecosystems and partners.

IMG_3023

IMG_3032

What Happens To Old Systems-On-A-Chip When No One Wants Them?

Quad-Core connected single-board computers with GPUs, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth got a bit cheaper last year.
(Graph loosely based on Kickstarters from the last two years)

Mobile phones are neat aren’t they? Tiny, thin, capable of driving touch-screens and your favorite app stores as fancy mobile operating systems. Today’s phones come packed with capabilities such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GPS, GPRS, light-sensors, gyroscopes, audio, GPUs and accelerometers.

As a result of years of fierce competition, the average person now carries a super-computer in their pocket which also doubles as a cloud-connected sensor-hub.

Underneath all these whizzy sensors and features is an amazing core element: The System-On-A-Chip or SoC, a full computer composed of many different processors packed into the smallest space possible, the miracle of “Heterogeneous Computing.”

SoCs have been produced by the train-load for the last several years…which raises a question: What happens to old SoCs after they get “put out to pasture.” What happens to older versions of these components six months later when “the next-next best thing” comes out?

According to market forces, their prices drop..

Quick Poll: Raise your hand if you want an Android phone built on processing components from two years ago. Anyone? Anyone? Didn’t think so.

Now raise your hand if you want a single-board computer, quad-core with a GPU capable of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi for $9? I saw a couple more hands go up for that one.

These left-over SoCs live new lives, they get stuffed into single-board computers and repurposed on the hobby market, perhaps added to drones or robots. Maybe they form the core of new low-cost educational computers to teach kids in India to learn how to code. Who knows!

Now close your eyes and imagine a growing stockpile of hundreds of millions of these components:  The guts of this year’s stellar Android phones that don’t get sold gathering dust in boxes someplace in China with nowhere else to go but into the next Kickstarter.

How about a $3 quad-core GPU, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth computer?

How about $1?

Enjoy the future.

IBM Bluemix Commercial IoT Workshop #2

Last week I executed on the second (and final, as an evangelist) Industrial Internet of Things Workshop focusing on Wind River Linux, Helix Device Cloud, Intel Edison (IoTDevKit) and our Moon Island Gateways. 40 IIOT developers selected from a list of locals were in attendance. Our projection surface was a bed sheet but hey, sometimes you just have to roll with things.

Seeking Inflection Points: My new role at Intel

makers

Starting tomorrow I will be taking on the position of “Inventor Platform Manager, Strategic Partners” at Intel’s New Technology Group (focusing on Makers and Innovators). In this role, I will be working with a broad ecosystem of cloud partners (Amazon, Microsoft, IBM, Google etc), developers, makers and hardware accelerators to increase the usability and adoption of Intel’s maker products such as Intel Edison, Intel Curie, the Arduino 101 (and future devices).

Looking forward to meeting the next generation of makers, couldn’t be more excited to be in this role within Intel at this time.