Meeting Massimo

One benefit of the job is getting to meet interesting people, in this case Massimo Banzi who was a founder of Arduino. Here we are with the whole MIG Product Team, good times.

MIG_Platform_Team

AWS NYC Pop-Up Loft Lightning Talk + Workshop

IMG_3037

I was invited by Amazon Web Services to give a talk at the NYC Loft to discuss some of the trends happening in Internet of Things over the last year and run a workshop focusing on Intel Edison over the course of two days.

Thanks to the excellent folks from Dash and Canary we had a great lineup of talks last Thursday, probably around 80-100 developers were in attendance and another 40 for the workshop the following day. Really enjoyed making the trip and seeing the new AWS space, looking forward to exploring many more potential areas of collaboration between Intel and AWS IoT ecosystems and partners.

IMG_3023

IMG_3032

What Happens To Old Systems-On-A-Chip When No One Wants Them?

Quad-Core connected single-board computers with GPUs, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth got a bit cheaper last year.
(Graph loosely based on Kickstarters from the last two years)

Mobile phones are neat aren’t they? Tiny, thin, capable of driving touch-screens and your favorite app stores as fancy mobile operating systems. Today’s phones come packed with capabilities such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GPS, GPRS, light-sensors, gyroscopes, audio, GPUs and accelerometers.

As a result of years of fierce competition, the average person now carries a super-computer in their pocket which also doubles as a cloud-connected sensor-hub.

Underneath all these whizzy sensors and features is an amazing core element: The System-On-A-Chip or SoC, a full computer composed of many different processors packed into the smallest space possible, the miracle of “Heterogeneous Computing.”

SoCs have been produced by the train-load for the last several years…which raises a question: What happens to old SoCs after they get “put out to pasture.” What happens to older versions of these components six months later when “the next-next best thing” comes out?

According to market forces, their prices drop..

Quick Poll: Raise your hand if you want an Android phone built on processing components from two years ago. Anyone? Anyone? Didn’t think so.

Now raise your hand if you want a single-board computer, quad-core with a GPU capable of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi for $9? I saw a couple more hands go up for that one.

These left-over SoCs live new lives, they get stuffed into single-board computers and repurposed on the hobby market, perhaps added to drones or robots. Maybe they form the core of new low-cost educational computers to teach kids in India to learn how to code. Who knows!

Now close your eyes and imagine a growing stockpile of hundreds of millions of these components:  The guts of this year’s stellar Android phones that don’t get sold gathering dust in boxes someplace in China with nowhere else to go but into the next Kickstarter.

How about a $3 quad-core GPU, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth computer?

How about $1?

Enjoy the future.

IBM Bluemix Commercial IoT Workshop #2

Last week I executed on the second (and final, as an evangelist) Industrial Internet of Things Workshop focusing on Wind River Linux, Helix Device Cloud, Intel Edison (IoTDevKit) and our Moon Island Gateways. 40 IIOT developers selected from a list of locals were in attendance. Our projection surface was a bed sheet but hey, sometimes you just have to roll with things.

Seeking Inflection Points: My new role at Intel

makers

Starting tomorrow I will be taking on the position of “Inventor Platform Manager, Strategic Partners” at Intel’s New Technology Group (focusing on Makers and Innovators). In this role, I will be working with a broad ecosystem of cloud partners (Amazon, Microsoft, IBM, Google etc), developers, makers and hardware accelerators to increase the usability and adoption of Intel’s maker products such as Intel Edison, Intel Curie, the Arduino 101 (and future devices).

Looking forward to meeting the next generation of makers, couldn’t be more excited to be in this role within Intel at this time.

Commercial IoT Workshop (with IBM Bluemix)

Spent the last two days hauling tons of laptops and gateways in a U-Haul truck, that was fun. 40 developers, 40 Moon Island Gateways, 40 Intel Edison and Sensor Kits and an IBM Bluemix workshop, fun times.